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Where to meet happy elephants in Thailand

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This is probably one of the most important posts I’ve ever written. Not only because the topic is extremely important, but also the meeting with elephants was extraordinary. You probably know from my other post (click here) that elephant tourism is highly developed in Asian countries, like Thailand or Cambodia. It means that in many places popular with tourists you can take a ride on elephants or watch tricks made by them (painting, dancing) etc. There are so many marketing lies that create unreal stories about elephants. One of these is that they are very talented so that they are able to paint. Do you really believe that a wild animal like elephant likes to paint flowers and trees because it has an artistic soul? Elephants are trained and forced to do that in pain and fear. Elephant riding is another popular attraction. The perspective of riding on a huge animal is very tempting. What a great photo can we take, can’t we? Unfortunately, there is a dark side of this practice. Did you know that elephant’s back is not prepared to carry a burden like a platform with people? It causes an extreme pain and irreversible change in its spine. There is also another myth about elephants’ business. The famous hooks used by keepers to control the animals. It’s kind of disturbing to see a guy who stabs an elephant’s head to keep it walking. When you ask, someone is telling you that it’s nothing wrong because elephant’s skin is very thick. Stubbing doesn’t hurt it. Well, guess what? Elephant’s skin is as delicate as human’s, and every single kick, punch or hit hurts it a lot. Just imagine your skin in a contact with a hook. Then you have an answer that something is wrong. Why I write about it? The reason is that I want to show you an alternative option for meeting with this beautiful animal. There is a place where elephants are respected and cared for -Elephant Nature Park in Chiang Mai, Thailand.Owners of the park rescue elephants from circuses, labor in forests and tourism industry.
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AustraliaPopularWildlife

Crazy parrots in Australia

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When I’ve been living in Sydney, a friend of mine told me that very soon I would become a ‘bird lady’. Well, it doesn’t sound cool at all, but I think he might have been right in some way. Aussie life brought me the most surprising and unexpected situations with the wildlife I have ever faced ^_^ Living in the city center with dozen of crazy, white cockatoo was one of them. Let me start from the beginning. One day I was siting on my terrace eating Sunday breakfast. It was an ordinary morning, like any other at that time. Then, quite a big parrot sat on my table. I saw the cockatoos before in the neighborhood, but not from such a close distance. I need to admit that I was fascinated. I was frozen for a moment, because I didn’t want to frighten the bird. Initially, I didn’t know that they are not afraid of anything. Never. Maybe a lack of food is their worst fear :) I’ve asked my fiancé to make a quick shot, because I was sure that it’s a once in a lifetime opportunity to have a photo with Aussie cockatoo. Well, I was wrong again. A minute later I had 20 of them sitting all around me, eating my brekky and… my ponytail as well. The truth is that it was fun. Especially, because I thought that it was a coincidence and I needed to catch the moment. It wasn’t. They’ve stayed for the next few months. Since that day, every morning I had a wake up call from the cockatoos. They didn’t even beg for any food. They were just sitting on my terrace when I was working so they could be close to me. My home office ;) A few weeks from our first meeting, some of them were jumping into my apartment, sitting on the floor or on the chair, as if it was their home. I could pet some of them and let them sit on my arms. Like with the regular pets, except that they were wild parrots. Sometimes
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Fit TipsPopular

8 Essential Strategies for Hot Weather Running

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We all know that running in hot weather isn’t the most pleasurable thing to do. Running in high temperature and humidity can put you at risk for dehydration, heat stroke and other heat-related illnesses. Probably the best idea would be not to run, when summer is on top. However, what about the situation that you travel to the hot countries and you still want to keep fit and hold your training routine? If you keep in mind these few tips, it’s still possible to run in tropics effectively. Run early morning or late evening Try to avoid running between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. The sun is very strong so running will be very difficult. The best time is morning (right before a sunrise) or early evening (right after the sunset). These are the coolest times of the day so you won’t burn alive :) Another extra bonus is that you will have an opportunity to watch a beautiful sunrise or sunset (is there anything better than morning cardio on the beach?). Avoid open, sunny spaces Don’t try to run on open spaces like roads or fields. They will be heated up the most, especially during the day. If you must train during the sunny hours, try to stick to shady trails, parks or forests. When it’s hot, it’s even better to run in the city where you can find a shadow, rather than in the nature under the full sun. When you live in tropic countries, it’s likely that you will experience a heavy rain. Especially in wet season it rains at the afternoon or early evening. It’s actually a blessing for runners. After the rain, the air is fresh and cool so it’s a perfect time to go for a run. Use this moment for a workout. Hydrate yourself regularly The easiest way to avoid heat disorders is to keep your body well hydrated. Remember to drink at least a glass of water before running. If you plan a long run, take a bottle of water with you and drink it while exercising. During the long workouts, it’s
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Fit around the worldNew ZelandPopular

Kayaking in New Zealand – the worst nightmare ever!

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New Zealand is well know as a country of adventure. It’s acctually said that NZ offers every kind of adventure and extreme sport you can think about. I’m not a big fan of extreme sports but I like to keep my day active and full of new challenges. That’s why, when I only had a chance, I decided to try the very famous sea kayaking. There are a few places where you can try it but I chose Nelson Bay on the South Island. Mostly because it’s supposed to be the most beautiful and spectacular place to swim around. If you want to hire a kayak you will have many options to choose, eg. 1 hour, half day or full day tour. You can also hire a guide who is swimming next to your kayak and helps you, I don’t know with what (maybe he gives you some jokes to entertain?). Anyway, I find this kind of guidance absolutely useless since the only thing you need to know is to paddle back and forward what doesn’t seem to be very difficult. Anyhow, me and my fiancee have decided to buy a half day trip without guide what simply means that we had a double kayak only for ourselves for a few hours. We were told to come to the office at 9 a.m. to take part in quick training (well, it wasn’t that quick because it took almost 1,5 hour) about using the kayak on the sea. After that, we were ready to go (or we thought we were). The weather seemed to be perfect that day. The sun was shining and we were very excited about what we were going to see. Kayaking between the islands was supposed to be the best part of the trip. On one of them there was na huge colony of seals. Sounds fun, doesn’t it? We started to paddle full of hope and good vibes. After 10 minutes we barely moved forward, we were totally wet (as water poured inside the kayak all the time) and cold (despite it was a summer in NZ, the
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IndonesiaPopular

5 top things to do in Ubud, Bali

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When it comes to Bali the opinions are quite splitted. Some of the people I’ve met were absolutely crazy about this island. Others had many doubts, like the one the island was quite neglected, despite it had an opinion of the paradise. Well, depands on what are your expectations, you will love it or hate it. For sure, it has an amazing marketing, so it’s hard to estimate if it’s worthy or not, until you won’t try to spend there some time. I’ve spent a week in Ubud and I enjoyed it. There are many thigs you can do  and I’m pretty sure that everybody will find something interesting. This is my list of must do in Ubud: Rice Fields If you like to treck a little, and temperature and humidity don’t bother you, you will enjoy a Rice Field trip. Balinese fields are juicy green and look absolutely beautiful. Especially during the rainy season everything seems to be more green and abundant. If you spend some time on appreciation of the Balinese nature, you will also have an opportunity to see how local people work there to keep everything in order.  Around the rice fields you can also find many places where rice is dried before selling. Rice drying Monkey Forest This place is a must. If you like a wildlife, like I do (and I like it a lot), you will spend a nice time there. Monkey Forest is just a few minutes from the center of Ubud. It is one of the most popular places, but if you go there in a lunchtime it won’t be very crowded. The place is quite big, so you will have plenty of space for a nice walk around old temples and amazing jungle everywhere. You will find a dozens of monkeys all over the place. Click here to read more about Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary. Coffee plantation I really like this place mostly because it has a nice garden where you can see how the tropical fruits grow (eg. pinapple – I’m always suprised that it looks more like a flower than
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